Christmas Truce I

Christmas Truce I, Maquette for Bronze Sculpture
30 x 27 x 14 centimetres (12 x 11 x 6 inches) Not including the Base


In my eyes, Christmas 1914 taught us what human nature is really about. From the trenches of both sides soldiers were singing, drinking, eating, celebrating Christmas in the best spirit possible under the circumstances. For a short period, at many points along the front, there were more important things in mind than war and killing.

Fed up, cold and bored, men slowly came out of their posts to meet their neighbours, the enemy opposite, exchanging cigarettes, chocolate and other scant possessions. I believe it is in human nature to share, to connect, to be kind and playful. I am convinced that, given the choice, most men would have celebrated and forgot all about conflict, had they not been following orders to the contrary.

In fact, I wonder how many struggled to continue to fight after they saw the reality of war, or experienced the Christmas truce. Wouldn’t most of us prefer to see our children get together, play, and learn from each other rather than encouraging them to fight to the death in the name of what they believe in? Perhaps what we think of as apathy is more a natural aversion to conflict.
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Christmas Truce I

Christmas Truce I
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
Christmas Truce I, Maquette for Bronze Sculpture
30 x 27 x 14 centimetres (12 x 11 x 6 inches) Not including the Base


In my eyes, Christmas 1914 taught us what human nature is really about. From the trenches of both sides soldiers were singing, drinking, eating, celebrating Christmas in the best spirit possible under the circumstances. For a short period, at many points along the front, there were more important things in mind than war and killing.

Fed up, cold and bored, men slowly came out of their posts to meet their neighbours, the enemy opposite, exchanging cigarettes, chocolate and other scant possessions. I believe it is in human nature to share, to connect, to be kind and playful. I am convinced that, given the choice, most men would have celebrated and forgot all about conflict, had they not been following orders to the contrary.

In fact, I wonder how many struggled to continue to fight after they saw the reality of war, or experienced the Christmas truce. Wouldn’t most of us prefer to see our children get together, play, and learn from each other rather than encouraging them to fight to the death in the name of what they believe in? Perhaps what we think of as apathy is more a natural aversion to conflict.